A Piper Lassie

Love this photo. A beauty from The Australasian newspaper (16 Sep 1899, page 27) on Trove.

a piper lassie 2 Jessie Maud Low was born in Penola, South Australia on August 24, 1881. This lovely lass, of Scottish parents, was Australia’s first lady Piper. At the time, she was the only one.

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Jessie was a twin to her sister Maggie May, born to their parents, Peter Low (1844-1926) and Margaret Park (1845-1919). Margaret was quite well known from her first marriage (1862) to Adam Lindsay Gordon, the poet (1833-1870). Their only child, Annie Lindsay (1867), died at 10 months. Margaret’s marriage to Peter Low (1873) produced their first set of twins, William Park and Ellispit Joann (1874), followed by Peter Lindsay (1876), David Alexander (1878), then the next twins mentioned above, and lastly was Bradshaw Gordon (1885).

On April 24, 1911, Jessie was married to Arnold Edmund Hughes (1888-1942). They had a daughter, Eileen May (1913-1984?) and a son, Murray Edmund (1914-1973). Jessie passed away in October 1966 and is buried with her husband at the Murray Bridge Cemetery (Eighth Drive, Grave 357) in Murray Bridge, S.A.

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Stillbirths in Victoria

Just a brief note on stillbirth registration in the state of Victoria.

  • Up until 1929-30, there was no legal framework to notify the government of a stillborn child.
  • In 1930, the Births Notification Act required the government to be notified of a stillbirth, but the birth was not registered.
  • In 1952, the Births, Death and Marriages Act 1928 was amended to require that all stillbirths must be registered. A birth certificate could then be issued, but not a death certificate, as the death occurred prior to the birth.

For further information on birth registration law, here is a direct link to the page on the Victorian Law Reform Commission website.

Census 2016

I thought it might be appropriate to say a few words with regards to the 2016 Census on Tuesday, August 9.

census2016Some people have privacy concerns and don’t want to lodge their name and address that identifies them with other personal information in the data. It’s a valid issue. In the digital world of today, there is a definite need for concern when it’s in the hands of the government.

If you are one that wants the census available to future family historians and genealogists in 100 years time, there are two ways to achieve this. If you don’t, we’re assured that your name and address will be destroyed from it in 4 years time.

Option 1. Fill in item 60 of the census form. This will enable your census to be kept by the National Archives of Australia, with names and address still attached, to be released in 100 years to the public. See image below.

Option 2. Fill in the paper version of the census form and photocopy it before sending. Or, do the online version while also doing the paper version to keep for yourself. This is only if you don’t want the government to hold on to your names and address after the 4 years, but want to retain the census to file away with your personal family history documents.

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GMCT’s New Deceased Search

gmct0GMCT (Greater Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust) has upgraded their deceased search with new mapping. I’d have to say that it’s quite an improvement on what it was. Especially now that it works with the Firefox browser. Even more so with the inclusion (finally!) of the Preston General Cemetery. Another new addition is the Footscray Cemetery, which the Trust recently took over.

Like the SMCT (Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust) search, GMCT also now requires you to click to confirm you have read and accept the terms and conditions. If you don’t click, you can’t search. My view is that it’s not necessary. Just the links to the terms and conditions would be adequate. I find it annoying.

gmct1The mapping itself looks good. You can even search from within the mapping system for someone else and the map is highly detailed. I had wondered why the main search results up until the upgrade had lost the service date column, but you’ll find the service date (if in the system) with the deceased details in the right side bar of the mapping page. You can also print or export the map result. Furthermore, you can also export the deceased persons details on the right side bar to an Microsoft Excel based CVS file. Click the images above or below to open full sized in a new tab.

gmct2I’d have to say that GMCT has scored very well with this upgrade. Here is the link to the GMCT search page.